Chicago YIMBY: Lost Legends #5: Grand Central Station In South Loop

Grand Central Station Tower, Chicago, by Solon S. Beman. Built in 1890. Demolished in 1971. Historic Photo Credit: Richard Nickel Archive, Art Institute of Chicago Archival Image Collection.
Aerial photo of Chicago Grand Central Station. Grand Central Station, 1890, Solon Spencer Beman, 201 West Harrison Street. Photo Credit: Classic Trains Magazine
Grand Central Station, Chicago, Harrison Street Facade, by Solon S. Beman. 201 West Harrison Street. Built in 1890. Demolished in 1971. Historic Photo Credit: Richard Nickel Archive, Art Institute of Chicago Archival Image Collection.
Grand Central Station Tower with 13-foot dial grand clock, one of the largest in the US, Harrison Street Entrance, by Solon S. Beman. 201 West Harrison Street. Built in 1890. Demolished in 1971. Historic Photo Credit: Richard Nickel Archive, Art Institute of Chicago Archival Image Collection.
Grand Central Station, Chicago, Harrison Street Facade, by Solon S. Beman. 201 West Harrison Street. Built in 1890. Demolished in 1971. Historic Photo Credit: Richard Nickel Archive, Art Institute of Chicago Archival Image Collection.
Grand Central Station, Chicago, Harrison Street Facade, by Solon S. Beman. 201 West Harrison Street. Built in 1890. Demolished in 1971. Historic Photo Credit: Richard Nickel Archive, Art Institute of Chicago Archival Image Collection.
Grand Central Station, Chicago, Base of Tower, by Solon S. Beman. 201 West Harrison Street. Built in 1890. Demolished in 1971. Historic Photo Credit: Richard Nickel Archive, Art Institute of Chicago Archival Image Collection.
Grand Central Station, Chicago, Harrison Street Entrance, by Solon S. Beman. 201 West Harrison Street. Built in 1890. Demolished in 1971. Historic Photo Credit: Richard Nickel Archive, Art Institute of Chicago Archival Image Collection.
Grand Central Station, Chicago, Waiting Room, by Solon S. Beman. Built in 1890. Demolished in 1971. Historic Photo Credit: Richard Nickel Archive, Art Institute of Chicago Archival Image Collection.
Grand Central Station, Chicago, Entrance to Restaurant, by Solon S. Beman. Built in 1890. Demolished in 1971. Historic Photo Credit: Richard Nickel Archive, Art Institute of Chicago Archival Image Collection
Grand Central Station, Chicago, Train Shed, by Solon S. Beman. Built in 1890. Demolished in 1971. Historic Photo Credit: Richard Nickel Archive, Art Institute of Chicago Archival Image Collection
Grand Central Station demolition in 1971. Grand Central Station, 1890, Solon Spencer Beman, 201 West Harrison Street. Photo Credit: George Bova on Pinterest

“Chicago once had its own Grand Central Station, a now-demolished hub of railway activity in South Loop. This magnificent structure served as one of Chicago’s main passenger terminals for nearly 80 years. Today, we will delve into the chronicles of this lost legend, exploring its history, the vision of its architect, its demolition, and its present-day replacement.

“Constructed in 1890, Chicago’s Grand Central Station was the brainchild of the Chicago & Northern Pacific Railroad, a subsidiary of the Wisconsin Central Railroad (WC), which was itself owned by the Northern Pacific Railway (NP). It served as a major terminal for numerous rail lines, linking Chicago with various destinations across the United States.

“The man behind the design of Chicago’s Grand Central Station was none other than Solon Spencer Beman, a prominent architect of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Beman, who was also responsible for the design of Pullman, the first planned industrial town in the United States, crafted a vision for Grand Central Station that would be both functional and architecturally marvelous.

“The station’s exterior featured Norman Castellated architecture, characterized by brownstone and granite construction, as well as a 247-foot clock tower with an 11,000 pound bell. Meanwhile, the interior housed a grand waiting room with 26-foot ceilings and marble flooring.

“In the late 1960s, amidst declining passenger numbers and mounting financial pressures, the decision was made to raze the station. The demolition process began in 1969 and ended in 1971.

“The decision to demolish Grand Central Station was met with fierce opposition from preservationists and architectural enthusiasts who lamented the loss of this iconic structure, which had stood as a symbol of Chicago’s growth and progress for nearly eight decades. Nonetheless, the economic pressures and shifting transportation landscape ultimately sealed the station’s fate.

“The demolition of Grand Central Station was a significant architectural loss for the city. The station’s design and architectural splendor, as well as its role in shaping Chicago’s development, highlight the importance of preserving our historical treasures (a message that is still relevant today). The story of Grand Central Station’s rise and fall serves as a reminder of the delicate balance between progress and preservation, and the need to honor and protect the relics of our past.” (Crawford, Chicago YIMBY, 4/23/23)

“Architecturally, no other Chicago station approached Solon S. Beman’s monumental Grant Central of 1890. Its Norman tower, rising 247 feet at the corner of Harrison and Wells Streets, contained an 11,000-pound bell to warn travellers of the time, and its iron-and-glass train shed was one of the marvels of nineteenth-century engineering. The station also housed a deluxe hotel and was the departure point for the Baltimore & Ohio’s all-Pullman Capital Limited, the favored transport of Washington-bound Midwest politicians. The prominent Chicago architect Harry Weese called the razing of Grand Central Station in 1971 an act of “wanton destruction”.” (Lost Chicago, David Lowe, page 57)

Read the full story with 3D Modeling at Chicago YIMBY

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